An unconventional look at the world of moto header image 2

Getting un-Kreemed

January 2nd, 2008 · No Comments · Vintage, Workbench

Be Sociable, Share!

kreem_comboI have a very nice, low-hour 1974 Yamaha TY250 trials bike. I bought it last year and it’s in good shape but has two issues I need to fix – it leaks oil from the bottom of the motor somewhere, and the fuel tank is full of crap that keeps clogging the petcock. We’re going to have seven trials events within a 2-hour drive of the ATL this year so I want to get it ready to ride.

The problem with the fuel tank is two-fold:

  1. it’s full of rust that is sluffing off
  2. the rust is underneath a very bad KREEM sealer job that has detached from the metal and is actually making things way worse.

After digging around for a few weeks trying to figure what to do with it I pretty much decided to just buy a Sammy Miller fiberglass tank/seat combo, as I need to replace my trail kit seat with a trials unit anyway. But those SM units are over $400 here in the US, and you still need to coat the inside of them with POR-15 or something to keep the alcohol in our gas away from the resin. Anyway…

That spending $500 thing made me go back and look at the original tank again and I finally found a phone number for KREEM Products Inc in Somis, CA. I gave them a call and the tech there told me that if I fill the tank with acetone or MEK the KREEM sealer will go back to liquid. Of course, MEK and acetone will also eat the paint off the tank. Sadly, the tank has a very nice, resto paint job that someone paid pretty good money for. And was one of the reasons I paid a little more than I should have for the bike. And there’s no way I’m going to be able to get the crap out of the tank without messing it up. I don’t think.

Still, I thought I’d post the tech info here, in case someone else needs to undo a really bad KREEM job in the future.

Be Sociable, Share!


No Comments so far ↓

Like gas stations in rural Texas after 10 pm, comments are closed.