An unconventional look at the world of moto header image 2

The Freestand Motorcycle Hold Down

February 20th, 2008 · 1 Comment · Reviews

Be Sociable, Share!

tilted_standI overlooked this in my last post, but it’s a pretty cool idea. The Freestand strapless motorcycle tie-down system is from Ivie Racing in Memphis, TN (the dirty south is kicking some new product butt!) This pic shows the dirt bike model but they have variants that fit sport bikes and standard bikes, too. I can’t easily explain how this works, but I’ll try. The stands have a pair of open, semi-circular hooks attached to short stanchions that pivot from the center of the top cross piece. As you roll the bike forward the outer tip of the hooks catches on the inside of the fork legs. As you push the bike into the stand the hooks pivot to horizontal where they lock, preventing the forks from moving forward or backward. There’s a “how it works” video on the site that shows the stand in action.

It’s a cool engineering idea and, as the picture shows, holds the bike firmly in almost any position. There is no pressure on any part of the bike. All the force is transferred right into the fork stanchions and steering head. Best of all, it takes only one person because all you do is roll the bike into place. No chance of dropping it while you reach for tie-downs or fasten the clamps used on other systems like the MX Lock-n-Load or the Parts Unlimited Wheel Shoe (which I use). To be fair, the Freestand costs a lot more than either of those products, ranging from $250 to $350 depending on model. So I can’t see buying a bunch of these to fill your trailer, but I can see how one would be great in a shop or used on a lift in the garage. I almost always work on bikes alone, and getting one secured in the shop can be a little iffy. Talk to your significant other and see if she (or he) can get you one for Christmas.

Be Sociable, Share!


One Comment so far ↓

  • Mike Kincaid

    Man, that’s a cool idea. That’s one of those “I wish I’d thought of that” products. Mike Kincaid