Archive for offroad

MotoPeds acquired by MotoVox

The very cool urban assault-style hybrid motorized mountain bikes made by MotoPeds may be coming soon to a retail powersports outlet near you.MotoPed urban assault survival bike According to this press release the company has been acquired by APT MotoVox Group Inc. APT has patented a carburetor technology called SmartCarb for two-stroke engines which the company claims will push the MotoPed near the 200 mpg range.

In my humble opinion no Doomsday Prepper should be without one of these. In fact, every apocalypse bunker should come with one as standard issue.

There is no good reason that living on the fringe can’t be cool.

This is jumping jumps

This is jumping jumps. It’s not motocross. Don’t confuse the two.

If you want to jump jumps, fine. Go to it. This is cool, too. Focus on it. Try to be the best at it. But don’t get on the track and pretend you’re a racer. You’re not. You’ll just be a 2x loser, not good at either one.

How to start a big-bore two-stroke

This video was put together by some AZ vintage riders — Bill Ramsey of The Motorcycle Accessory Shop made the video, based on a technique he learned from Mark Smith. I struggle to start my old big-bore CZs, and have repeatedly ripped the buckles off my cool vintage Hi-Point MX boots. Not cool. Maybe this little trick will save my boots, until I crash and have to start it the old-fashioned way. Of course, this only works with bikes that have carburetors.

Honda SL 70 – a story

My brother David in 1974 jumping the SL 70 off a bank on an unnamed junior high school campus

Update: This story has been updated to reflect the facts. Check the comments for details. :end:

A while back Mitch Boehm of Moto Retro contacted me about some old SL 70 stories. I don’t know if he used any of them or not as I haven’t gotten around to subscribing yet. But here’s one I didn’t send him.

After I “outgrew” my SL 70 I sold it to my younger brother. The top photo on the left is my brother jumping the SL 70 off a hill on some unnamed junior high campus. We were such scofflaws.

Anyway, back in the early ’70s there was a big vacant lot, probably a couple of acres, right off of 5th street and Palmer, just behind the Tyler Junior College campus.  TJC has a big football practice field there now, but back in the day it was just a wooded lot with a creek running through the back. Read More…

Rekluse Motor Sports, Inc. founder Al Youngwerth on PitPass Radio

Tonight, 06 APR 2010, Pit Pass Radio will have an interview with Al Youngwerth, the founder of Rekluse Motor Sports Inc. If you’ve watched any of the recent Supercross races and wondered how some of the riders manage to keep the engine running when they fall off the bike, it’s because they’re using a Rekluse centrifugal clutch.

I’ve never had the chance to ride with one of these things, and they’re only available for modern bikes, but I’m told they are the shizznit — the cat’s pajamas, the real deal, the best thing since sliced bread, etc. One of my buddies — Bill Ramsey of Motorcycle Accessory Shop in Mesa, AZ (2319 West Main Street, Mesa, AZ 85201-6839 (480) 835-6228) — says he tried to talk Al into giving him some parts to use to get one working on a vintage bike, but didn’t have any luck.

That’s too bad, because the new Core EXP clutch kit is, relatively, affordable at $800 — at least compared to the $2,000 these things cost originally. Now I know all you vintage guys are out there going, “What!? 800-freakin’ dollars!? I’ve bought entire bikes for less than that!” But from what I’ve been told these things are worth at least two CDI ignition upgrades and, if you’re on an old points-based ignition system that’s $450 per.

I admit, there’s probably only a tiny, tiny fraction of VMX riders who would shell out for something like this, but it would be nice to have the opportunity. I’m told if you ever ride with one you’ll never go back.

So tune in and see what Al has to say.

GPS for dirt bikes

I have a GPS unit (Garmin Zumo 450) that I use on my street bike, but for some reason it never occurred to me that you would use one on a dirt bike. Maybe because I live on the east coast and don’t go trail riding anywhere I’m likely to get lost… But there are trail areas in national parks in this half of the country that are certainly big enough to get lost in.

I came across this GPS and Dirt Bikes post over at the Dirt Bike Blogger. There’s a lot of good info, but the most interesting thing to me was this part about geocaching:

A GPS unit will also allow you to participate in geocaching – a great addition to trail riding. Geocaching is basically a high-tech treasure hunt. Caches are hidden and listed on the Internet (try Geocaching.com) with only their coordinates and sometimes additional clues. The caches generally include a logbook and pencil to record visitors, and tokens or prizes that can be traded.

The author also discusses using the GPS and some additional software to map your own trails, and build your own maps. If you’re interested in such things have a look at the whole article.